DGM Live

The Girl With The Sunshine In Her Eyes

The second of the two songs sung by Lewis Taylor - a star perfomer on the album, who bizarrely has never even met the producer or the song-writer, preferring to work alone at home, sending and exchanging files.
David Singleton, twitching over the phrasing of one line, found himself recording MP3s in the studio to send the singer- thus inventing the new artform of "email conducting". With results this good, perhaps it will catch on.
Strings by Cathy Stevens and Chas Dickie, who, many moons ago used to do musical backings for the poet Owen Davis, before going their separate ways
- only to be reunited by The Vicar.

AUDIO SOURCE: Digital Multitrack

DGM AUDIO QUALITY

AVERAGE CUSTOMER RATING

TRACK
TIME
01
The Girl With The Sunshine In Her Eyes
02:43
Written by Gary Weisel
You do something to me
This little song caught me by surprise.  I enjoyed the Vicar’s earlier tickle but this one really captured my heart, somehow.  It does not happen often that I find myself hankering for a song and have to play it over and over again.  But Sunshine did that to me.  Is it the happy feeling in the lyrics and melodies?  The tasty chord changes and vocal harmonies?  The string counterpoints?  In any case, I was genuinely charmed by this tickle and hope that the Vicar continues with his mysterious, but apparently fruitful, labors....
Written by Ed Korczynski
...ghost of Brian Wilson...
...someone wants to be Brain Wilson or Russell Mael... Maybe significant sonic detail is lost when playing this song over little computer speakers, but the arrangement and vocals sound mediocre to me when heard in low resolution (and I currently lack the abilty to play digital files in high resolution).
Written by Harry Spade
Very refreshing
I hear the Beatles influence as mentioned in the other reviews, and I also hear the  Beach Boys in the harmonized vocals. You can’t beat that combination.I’ll be listening to this for a while.
Written by Fabio Palmieri
here again
I guess I’m becoming a Vicar fan! Just like «In Dying Fire» this piece reveals a wonderful taste for pop in its authentical terms. Again, mr.Partridge springs to my mind as the first reference. Since Andy is one of my favourite authors of all time, take this a token of my appreciation.
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